Terrain Indicators of Water

Photo by James Stevens

Photo by James Stevens

10/20/14
To Do Today:

  • PT – Cardio – Run 30 min, max distance // Strength – Body weight: 5 sets of:  1) strict pull-ups, max reps; Squats x 20; Push-ups x 15; Lunges x 10/leg // Core – Plank: 3 sets of side-lying bridge, 45-60 sec side/30 sec rest between sides/Run 400m between core sets. 2 min max rest between sets.

Terrain Indicators of Water

When no surface water is available, look for hidden surface sources and ground water. Indicators include an abundance of lush green vegetation, drainage areas, and low-lying areas.

terrainwater

  • Valleys and Low areas. Follow the terrain lower to find natural depressions where water may collect or flow. In a sand dune belt, any available water will be found beneath the original valley floor at the edge of dunes.
  • Creek beds. Look at foot of concave bank areas. Creek beds are easily discernible in dry areas because of the relatively green vegetation and taller trees following the course of the creek. Unless there has been recent rain in the area the creek bed will probably be quite dry. You may be lucky enough to locate damp sand or mud at the bends of the creek or by digging in the creek bed at a likely spot. Water can be extracted from the damp sand or mud by soaking a rag in soil and wringing out the water into a container. The exposed tree roots in the creek bed can be cut in lengths and drained of their fluid early in the morning. To reduce the risk of infection, any surface water must be boiled.
  • Rock Formations. Look at foot of cliffs or the bottom of rock outcroppings. If there is any water seepage from the ground, it is usually to be found near rock formations, where the terrain is rugged and undulating. Rocky areas are also ideal for rain catchment. Rain soaks very quickly into the soil, whereas it can lie in pools on a rocky surface for as long as two weeks. Look under rick formations, fissures, and in crevices. Carry flexible tubing to reach deeper into rock depressions or use soaking rag.  A zip-lock bag is useful for scooping water from shallow pools.
  • Salt Lakes and Wadi’s. Look in nearest depression behind first dune away from dry/wet/salty lake. After rain has fallen, the top 3 mm of a salt lake is fresh water. It can be siphoned off by using a grass straw or tubing.
  • Windmills. Erected in many remote farming/ranching stations in order to provide lift service to wells, dams and soaks. These can be seen from a long distance and usually have animal tracks leading to them. Check to see that the water at these mills has not gone salty.
  • Water seepage. Look for damp surface sand. Natural springs and soft rock erosion areas (slopes, banks, etc.).
  • Coastal Areas. Sea water may only be consumed after it has been distilled: Dig hole deep enough to allow water to seep in; obtain rocks, build fire, heat rocks; drop hot rocks in water; hold cloth over hole to absorb steam; wring water from cloth. An alternate method can be used if a container or bark pot is available: Fill container or pot with seawater; build fire and boil water to produce steam; hold cloth over container to absorb steam; wring water from cloth. Water may also be found in coastal areas by digging behind the first group of sand dunes: Dig high up on the beach above the tide mark. It will taste brackish and should only be used in small quantities.

 

Note on vehicles

If traveling in a vehicle, extreme temperature variations between night and day may cause condensation on metal surfaces. Use cloth to absorb water, then wring water from cloth. Purification or distillation should be conducted for water collected from metal surfaces.


Information contained on this website is for general information and educational purposes only. Please refer to our Disclaimer and Terms and Conditions before attempting any technique described herein.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.